Tech Journalist

Sunny Bains has written hundreds of articles for dozens of publications in her work as a journalist. Her approach has been to follow her technical passions and to spend time really getting to know an area before starting to write about it. Her first love was holography, which led her into 3D displays, then displays generally, and also into optical computing and machine vision. This latter interest inspired her to look more closely at emerging computing technologies generally, and particularly related to intelligent signal processing for robot senses. From here she moved into the area of neuromorphic engineering: creating analog circuits with neuron-like functionality to process incoming signals the way biology does.

Along the way, Bains has also followed many related fields. She has a strong interest in novel electronic and optoelectronic devices, materials, novel mechanics for robotics (such as electro-active polymers), and many other enabling technologies.

In the last few years she has focussed on teaching Tech Journalism (among other things) at UCL and writing her book on the process of researching and writing about technology (more on this in the section on her work as an educator).

You can see a complete list of her published works (with links where available) by going to her journalism archives.

Portfolio

Explaining the Future: How to Research, Analyze, and Report on Emerging Technologies
Oxford University Press, February 2019

Questioning the integrity of the John Templeton Foundation
J. Evolutionary Psychology, 3 March 2011

Bionic brain chips could overcome paralysis
New Scientist, 1 September 2009

Research bots leverage open-source for child-like intelligence
Electronic Engineering Times
, 10 July 2008

Mixed Feelings
Wired
, April 2007

Catastrophic ‘fuse’ effect may be preventable and have practical uses
Laser Focus World, March 2004

Machines with a human touch 
The Economist
, 22 September 2001

Radiation pressure from evanescent wave measured
OE Reports, October 2000

Optoelectronics: Double helix doubles as engineer
Science, 27 March 1998